Chocolate, Peanut Butter & Banana Shake Recipe

Chocolate, Peanut Butter & Banana Shake Recipe

The August Bank Holiday this year was a gorgeous hot one! After my teaching was done for the day I was craving an ice cold milkshake, so when I got home that’s exactly what I had 😀  I decided to make this with stuff I had in the cupboard/fridge, as you do… The final result tasted delicious, so I am sharing this with you in case you fancy giving it a try. Here’s the recipe for my Chocolate, Peanut Butter & Banana Shake:

– 1 cup milk (I used coconut milk)

– Half a frozen banana

– 1 tbsp That Protein Blissful Brown Rice & Raw Cacao Super Protein* (or substitute with cacao powder if you don’t have this, to keep the chocolatey taste)

– Half tbsp maca powder

– Half tbsp chia seeds

– 1 tsp peanut butter

– Ice cubes

Simply add all the ingredients to a blender and blend away.

Enjoy! 😀

(*NB – this post is not sponsored – That Protein is a product I enjoy using and recommend if you are looking for a good quality plant-based protein.)

Yin Yoga: Square Pose

Yin Yoga: Square Pose

 

 

{WATCH} Yin YogaSquare Pose.

In this short video, filmed at Evolve Wellness Centre in South Kensington, I show you a couple of propping options to try when practising Square Pose. In this deep hip opening pose, typically, a sensation of intensity / deep stretch is felt around the hips, glutes and lower back, all of which may be accentuated by folding the upper body forward while you are here.

Depending on the tightness of your hips, the size and shape of your femoral heads (the top of the femur/thigh bone) this deep hip opener can seem a bit daunting. (It may be more challenging if you are naturally more internally rotated, meaning that poses Virasana or Saddle might come more easily to you).

If there is any sign of discomfort or pain in the knees do not practise this pose – try Easy Crossed Legs (as shown at the end of this video) as an alternative.

The Liver, Kidney and Gall Bladder meridians are stimulated here. Folding forward in Square Pose can stimulate the Urinary Bladder meridian too.

Find more short yoga videos on my YouTube channel here.

Wall Yin: Squat

Wall Yin: Squat

{WATCH} In this short video filmed at Evolve Wellness Centre in South Kensington I show you how to do a yin Wall Squat.

This is one of my favourites for stretching the hips and easing lower back tightness. If sitting in a squat feels tricky for you, give this version a try.

– Start by taking your legs up the wall. If you got find there is a gap between your hips/backs of the thighs and the wall (e.g. if your hamstrings are tight) that’s okay.

– Bend both knees and slide your feet down the wall, keeping your feet apart – about hip distance, but if you’d prefer to take the feet and knees wider than hip distance (similar to a ‘Happy Baby Pose’ shape) this will deepen the stretch into the hips.

– If you find at this stage that your hips have lifted off the floor and you don’t want this or are concerned about any stress on the sacrum, then slide back away from wall slightly to allow the sacrum to stay resting on the ground.

– Rest your arms where feels most comfortable.

This pose can stimulate several meridians – Liver and Kidney in particular, but also the Urinary, Gallbladder, Spleen and Stomach meridians.

Aim to be here for 2-3 minutes if you are a beginner. Or 3-5 minutes if you are a more experienced practitioner.

Resting in Legs up the Wall for several rounds of breath after coming out of this pose is a lovely transition.

I teach Yin Yoga here at Evolve on Wednesdays 6-7.15pm. Come along for some mid-week restoration. Click here to see my weekly class schedule.

NB – Always work within your own range of limits and abilities. If you have any medical concerns, speak to your doctor before practising yoga.

Getting to know Paula Hines from U Can Yoga – Yogamatters Interview

Getting to know Paula Hines from U Can Yoga – Yogamatters Interview

“Because yoga can help you feel so good, sometimes there is a tendency to present it all as positivity, love and light, heart-opening and unicorns. But in truth, it’s not all fluffy. When you practise yoga (not just asana) for a while, you find that it can make you more aware of the not so good too and teach you a lot about yourself (if you’re ready and willing to listen). So, I don’t expect myself or others to be perfect – after all, we are all in this together! It is all an on-going, life-long practice.”

I was recently interviewed by Yogamatters – just a few of the topics we touched on include:

  • the importance of self-care
  • why representation and visibility of diversity in yoga matters
  • how my own experience of stress and injury has influenced my yoga practice and teaching

And much more. You can read the interview in full over at the Yogamatters blog by clicking here.

Thanks so much to Yogamatters for the interview feature 🙏🏾  🙏🏾  🙏🏾

Yin Yoga: Dragonfly Pose

Yin Yoga: Dragonfly Pose

{WATCH} In this short video filmed at Embody Wellness I show you a few propping options and suggestions for Dragonfly pose.

Yin yoga provides us with the opportunity to let go of striving so bear in mind that we are not striving for an end goal of uber-flexibility. Instead, aim for the variation of the pose that is most comfortable for you and allows you to stay here happily. This is where props can be especially helpful.

If sitting upright in the pose is difficult you could try this version at the wall – {WATCH} Wall Yin: Dragonfly.

Dragonfly can provide a pleasing stretch along the back side of the body and stimulates the Liver, Kidney, Urinary Bladder and Spleen meridians.

While you are in this pose you may feel an intensity or sense of a deep stretch in the hamstrings in particular. NB – Intensity is okay but pain is not.

Aim to be here for 1-3 minutes if you are a beginner or 3-5 minutes if you are more experienced.

Dragonfly is one of the poses we regularly practise in my Flow & Release class here at Embody on Sundays 6-7.15pm. Find more details at http://embodywellness.co.uk/

NB – Always work within your own range of limits and abilities. If you have any medical concerns, speak to your doctor before practising yoga.